Steroids & Caffeine

JeremiahFrom time to time I read one of the lessons at the Holy Name of Jesus Cathedral in Raleigh. The first reading on July 22nd is from Jeremiah. Normally I like to avoid Jeremiah and Job as they are not the most cheerful of prophets and I prefer to enjoy the more declamatory words of Isiah, Ezekiel or Nathan.
The reading on the 22nd is about the negligent “shepherds” of the people who deserved better leadership.
Much of Jeremiah’s work was in Judah’s capital Jerusalem. He tried to keep several kings faithful to their stewardship  amidst an atmosphere of political intrigue and backstabbing. Jeremiah was blunt about what was right and what was not, and he suffered at the hands of the powerful because of his outspokenness. At the time of his prophecy, a good king in Judah had just been replaced by a king who put the country in thrall to Egypt. Jeremiah raged against this policy.
The reading is Jeremiah’s response to the negligent leaders. I first read the passage as a reproachful piece but looking at the readers’ notes I was encouraged to see that it is proclamatory and that I should not let Jeremiah sound like he’s on Valium. If anything, he should sound as if he is on steroids and caffeine.
He was a vigorous, courageous, outspoken man. He thunders on behalf of a God outraged at the powerful people’s neglect of their responsibility to the poor. “I gave you the privileges of a shepherd, you mislead and scatter the flock!”
Any linkage between the events and characters of 200 B.C. and the present day are purely unintentional and coincidental.
On the other hand, I think I’ve known some readers for whom Valium is the default mode when tackling the readings. But for me, for this week at least it’s a case of onwards with the steroids and caffeine!

On this day – 4th May

Readers of my blog may recall that on the 4th May I regularly raise a glass of Guinness or a G&T in memory of my late grandmother (Alice Luck) who was born on 4th May 1891.
I am currently reading Malachy McCourt’s History of Ireland and he gives a brief account of Padraig Pearse’s life which ended as Pearse was executed on 4th May 1916 for being one of the leaders of the 1916 Easter Uprising.
There is the story that as Padraig and his brother Willie set off from home to begin the Uprising, their mother told them not to do anything rash.
Grandmothers and mothers are always like that!
Sláinte mhaith to all

The Rain Makes All Things Beautiful

The full verse continues Flowers and Grasses too. And, I like to think that it also makes houses beautiful.
Our house is now listed on the Weichert Luxury Homes site and as the sun comes out it can only look better in real life than it does in the photographs
The winter in Raleigh has been quite brutal from time to time. Not so bad as in the North East of the country but occasionally quite harsh with overnight temperatures in the lower twenties Fahrenheit.
So, today I was quite pleased to see that the beautyberry has survived in its exposed position and is showing some small tentative green shoots. The Hypericum is looking set to flourish and the early Azealia’s are acting as though Spring has finally sprung. On the other hand, the Crepe Myrtles and the Dogwood are evidencing distinct signs of remaining under the duvet until it is absolutely safe to come out.

Des Res with Mod Cons

In 1967 Thomas Holmes and Richard Rahe produced an inventory of life-changing events known as the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS) which, surprisingly, ranked the act of moving home as the 28th most stressful life change. I am surprised at the ranking and can only presume that time has moved on and that moving home has moved up the scale.
My professional life is realty and last June there were 90,553 of us in North Carolina, so there is great pressure to get everything right when one’s own home goes on sale.
All of which is a roundabout way of blogging that our house at 5316 Coronado Dr., Raleigh 27609 is on the market at $620,000.
The house is a real gem and is in move in condition. We have been very caring of the property and have meticulously updated it as necessary. The upgrades include the kitchen, the appliances, the kitchen cabinetry and porcelain tiles in the kitchen and bathrooms. There are walk-in showers (one double with a frameless enclosure). All full bathrooms have luxury showerheads. There is beautiful hardwood flooring throughout,
Other features include:
Dual zoned HVAC system,
freshly painted exterior,
attached garage,
detached wired storage building and a
well landscaped, fenced yard,
paver patio.
The house shows well and the photographs if anything understate its attractiveness.
In short it is a des.res. with updtd mod cons, twenty minutes from the airport and downtown.
It’s well worth a look and full details are can be found by clicking 0n 5316 Coronado Dr 180215. The photographs can be seen on https://raleigh.weichert.com/74909934/
Please feel free to call or email me with any queries.
Better still, please buy the house from us or refer it to your friends who might find it just the home they are looking for.

Avoiding Disaster – the Message from a Stained Glass Window

I was recently idling in the Sacred Heart Church in Raleigh when I happened upon one of the stained glass windows depicting the early life of Christ.
At first sight it appears to be an idyllic happy family get together. Mary watchfully spinning, Joseph standing guard over the infant Jesus and the infant Jesus himself with a hammer and chisel in his hand working his will on a piece of wood.
But where is the Judean Department of Occupational & Safety, where is the Nazareth Child Protection Agency?
The child is not wearing safety goggles nor is he wearing protective gloves.
It’s all very well saying that the child has his own protective guardian angels, and perhaps they will stop the chisels going blunt or other damage occurring to the craftsman’s tools. And why is Joseph holding an axe and looking vaguely lost?
Overall, it’s a picture which asks more questions than it answers.
And perhaps the real message is that unless you have the angels on your side, whatever you are doing, you had better wear appropriate (protective) clothing.

Every Child’s Right

I am always coming across relatively small charities which make a big impact for what they do. I once contributed to a clothing bank for street youth who had been arrested for being idle and who were destined to receive harsher sentences compared to those who seemed respectably turned out.
I experienced a similar epiphany last week when the Diaper Bank of NC came to my attention.
There is a serious shortage of diapers and other personal sanitary items among the poor in North Carolina. Diapers can cost as much as $100 a month per child and are not covered by SNAP (also known as food stamps) or the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children – better known as the WIC Program).
A recent study in The Journal of Pediatrics found that women in need of diapers reported more difficulty with stress management, depression, and coping with trauma—which negatively affects their child’s health.
Another study conducted by Feeding America, called In Short Supply: American Families Struggle to Secure Everyday Essentials, found that 48% of families who cannot afford basic household necessities delay changing a child’s diaper to make their diaper supply last longer.
All across North Carolina, there are stories of families who are struggling to provide diapers for their children to keep them dry, clean, and healthy. It is not just infants who are affected. Tears come to the eyes when you hear of young girls who cannot afford personal sanitary items and so stay away from school rather than be shamed.
The Diaper Bank of NC is a 501c3 organization. No goods or services are exchanged for donations, which are tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law.

Opportunities for Immortality

Brian Greenwich 170823This week’s Time Magazine features a report in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology on a study which found that light to moderate drinking was associated with a 20% reduced risk of death compared to no drinking at all.
Now we all know that death is the one certainty in life (hence the expression “dead cert”). So if we can reduce the risk of death to 80% we must be on to a winner.
Cheers!